Charlotte, Owens survive Hell in a Cell

first_imgDjokovic ‘rejuvenated’ by Murray top-spot battle Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Karl Anderson and Luke Gallows beat Enzo Amore and Big Cass with the Magic Killer.Bayley also pinned Dana Brooke after nailing the Bayley to Belly.In the pre-show, the team of Cedric Alexander, Lince Dorado, and Sin Cara beat the trio of Drew Gulak, Tony Nese, and Ariya Daivari after Alexander hit a Lumbar Check on Nese./rgaSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View comments 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas EDITORS’ PICK Roman Reigns retained his WWE United States Championship over Rusev in the third Hell in a Cell match of the night.The Big Dog fought his way out of The Accolade and nailed the Bulgarian Brute with a Samoan Drop on the steel steps. He then followed it up with a thunderous Spear for the three-count.Cesaro and Sheamus also beat The New Day, but failed to win the Raw Tag Team Championship due to disqualification.Cesaro already had Xavier Woods in the ring with a Sharp Shooter, while Sheamus fended off Big E on the outside and hit him with a trombone. Referee John Cone, though, saw Kofi Kingston nail Sheamus with a Trouble in Paradise just as Woods was tapping on Cesaro’s submission hold.Brian Kendrick also became the new WWE Cruiserweight Champion, submitting TJ Perkins with the Captain’s Hook.ADVERTISEMENT PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantinecenter_img MOST READ We are young BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Charlotte and Sasha Banks fought in a historic Hell in a Cell match for the Raw Women’s Championship. Photo by WWE.comThrough hell or high water, The Kevin Owens Show is still on.The Prizefighter successfully defended his WWE Universal Championship over Seth Rollins inside Hell in a Cell Sunday (MondayManila time) in Boston.ADVERTISEMENT Owens hit Rollins with a DDT on a steel chair and followed it up with a Pop-Up Powerbomb on two more chairs as he retained his belt.The brash Canadian fought back from a freak fall after Rollins Powerbombed him through two tables on the side of the ring, as Chris Jericho interjected himself and entered the cell to help Owens score the victory.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentBut the biggest spotlight of the night was placed on the ladies, as Charlotte Flair became a three-time Raw Women’s Champion after pinning Sasha Banks in the first ever women’s Hell in a Cell match to close the show.Flair took advantage of Banks’ bad back, nailing her with the Natural Selection to snare the title. Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PHlast_img read more

Archers all together now

first_imgPH among economies most vulnerable to virus Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Senators to proceed with review of VFA We are young Alab faces the Truth La Salle head coach Aldin Ayo gives out instructions to his players during their game against Ateneo in Game 1 of the UAAP Season 79 men’s basketball Finals Saturday, Dec 3, 2016 at Mall of Asia Arena. Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netLa Salle coach Aldin Ayo had no illusions that the UAAP Season 79 Finals series against heavy underdog Ateneo was going to be a cakewalk for his Green Archers.Not after watching his star-studded team struggle in the Final Four against Adamson, where he questioned his players’ willingness to sacrifice for the greater good of the team.ADVERTISEMENT Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 EDITORS’ PICK Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PHcenter_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes MOST READ The narrow 67-65 victory over the Blue Eagles in Game 1 last night put the Archers on the cusp of their second UAAP championship in four seasons. But winning felt more satisfying for Ayo as he saw his players get their acts together at crunch time before a raucous crowd of 16,712 at Mall of Asia Arena.The Archers rode on Ben Mbala’s shoulders for long stretches and Jeron Teng delivered on both ends down the stretch in the series opener, where they almost squandered a 14-point advantage against an Ateneo team that simply refused to quit.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad Ali“These players are going to do whatever it takes to win,” said Ayo, whose team can wrap up La Salle’s ninth crown with a victory at Smart Araneta Coliseum on Wednesday.“These are stars in high school. The fact that they were moving the ball and executing plays speaks of their willingness to sacrifice for the team. We didn’t have role players to start the season, but we’re seeing the players buy into our system.” Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise The statement speaks volumes for the Archers, arguably one of the most talented the Taft-based school has fielded in years. But after a scintillating start to the season, the signs of slippage started to appear when they lost to the Eagles, 81-93, in the second round and struggled against the Falcons, 71-66, in the Final Four.Struggling for most of the game, Teng came alive with two of the game’s biggest plays late in the contest. He completed a layup with 15.6 seconds remaining off a steal by Kib Montalbo to give the lead back to La Salle, 66-65, before blocking a potential game-tying jumper by Aaron Black on Ateneo’s next play.“I just had to step up,” said Teng, who had 10 points and four rebounds and three assists. “I wasn’t getting my flow in the game, and I needed to make up for it on the defensive end.”Teng feels that Game 2 will be even more difficult for the Archers to win.“I told my teammates that we have to play better because we looked nervous today,” he said. “We kept our supporters very nervous today.”UAAP FINALS – GAME 1: LA SALLE 67 – ATENEO 65LA SALLE 67—Mbala 20, Melecio 12, Teng 10, Sargent 7, Torres 5, Montalbo 4, Rivero P 3, Tratter 3, Rivero R 2, Caracut 1, Perkins 0, Baltazar 0.ATENEO 65—Black 12, Wong 9, Ravena 8, Ikeh 8, Nieto Mi 8, Go 6, Verano 5, Nieto Ma 5, Tolentino 2, Asistio 2, Porter 0, Mendoza 0.Quarters: 19-6, 36-26, 52-52, 67-65ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

NBA: Antetokounmpo surprised to know Coach Kidd was a great player

first_imgMOST READ Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Milwaukee Bucks. AFP photo/TIMOTHY A. CLARYCurrent Milwaukee Bucks superstar Giannis Antetokounmpo grew up in the streets of Athens, Greece and admittedly did not know much about the NBA growing up.His current coach Jason Kidd was one heck of a point guard before trading the ball for a clipboard, and surprisingly, the 22-year-old stud did not know much about his coach’s playing career either.ADVERTISEMENT Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Giannis Antetokounmpo powers Bucks in bounce back win over Celtics PLAY LIST 02:29Giannis Antetokounmpo powers Bucks in bounce back win over Celtics00:50Trending Articles06:27SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND EDITORS’ PICK Arellano trumps JRU, joins 2nd-place logjam in NCAA volleyball Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Senators to proceed with review of VFA As detailed in an article from Sports Illustrated, the ‘Greak Freak’ grew furious at his mentor after suffering a ‘DNP-CD’ (Did-Not-Play Coach’s decision) during Kidd’s first coaching year with the team in 2014.“I was like, ‘Let’s see what this guy did in his career, anyway,’” Antetokounmpo recounted, and did a quick Google search of Kidd’s bio on his phone.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliSPORTSWe are youngThe brash, young player was quickly put in his place, as the 6’11 lanky star discovered Kidd’s long list of accolades as a 10-time All-Star player, and being one of the game’s all-time greats.“I saw Rookie of the Year, NBA championship, USA Olympic gold medal, second in assists, fifth in made threes, blah, blah, blah. I was like, ‘Jesus freaking Christ, how can I compete with that? I better zip it,” he shared.center_img We are young Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Since the hysterical incident, the two have developed quite a strong bond and the results have been undeniable.Under Kidd’s tutelage, Antetokounmpo currently leads Milwaukee in every major statistical category—23.8 points, 9.0 rebounds, 5.9 assists, 1.9 blocks and 1.9 steals—and is on pace to become the Bucks’ first All-Star since Michael Redd in 2004.He is on his fourth season with the Wisconsin-based franchise, and has blossomed from his unlikely transition into taking the crucial point guard position. Khristian IbarrolaADVERTISEMENT Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine View commentslast_img read more

Saving rare orchids that are ‘confusingly difficult’ to grow in labs: Q&A with orchid expert Marc Freestone

first_imgLeek orchids are a group of small, native wildflowers found in bushlands across southern Australia. Of the 140-odd leek orchids known today, one-third are at risk of extinction, primarily from habitat loss.For some of the more threatened leek orchids with just a handful of plants known to exist, captive breeding and reintroduction to the wild might be the only way to save them, researchers say.But leek orchids are notoriously difficult to grow in labs, unlike many other orchids that can be easily artificially propagated.Mongabay spoke with orchid expert Marc Freestone who is trying to save leek orchids along with his colleagues at Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria and Australia National University. Few plants capture the imagination quite like orchids. When orchid fever gripped England in the early 1800s, wealthy aristocrats sent out orchid hunters to forests around the world in search of these exotic flowering plants. Many died in the process. Even today, collectors seek out the rarest and the prettiest of orchids from the wild, and orchids are among the most widely traded plant groups in the world.But many species of orchids are now under severe threat of extinction. Several are threatened by illegal collections from the wild because many orchid species occur in just a few locations, and removing them leads to the extinction of the species. Other orchids, especially the ones that grow in grasslands, are losing out to agriculture, grazing and development.Leek orchids are a case in point. They’re a group of small, native wildflowers found in bushlands across southern Australia. Of the 140-odd leek orchids known today, one-third are at risk of extinction, primarily from habitat loss. Several species, such as the lilac leek orchid (Prasophyllum colemaniae), whose only known population was destroyed by the development of a railway line, are already extinct. Others, such as the Shelford leek orchid (P. fosteri), are down to a handful of plants.Leek orchids occur in bushlands across southern Australia, and are threatened by habitat loss. Image by Marc Freestone.Time is running out for the endangered leek orchids. In fact, for some of the more threatened species with just a few populations, captive breeding and reintroduction to the wild might be the only way to save them, researchers say.But there’s a problem: leek orchids are deceptively hard to grow in labs, unlike many other orchids that can be easily artificially propagated. “Growing leek orchids is confusingly difficult,” Marc Freestone, a doctoral student at Australian National University, working with the Orchid Conservation Program at the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, told Mongabay.Freestone and his colleagues are, however, hopeful that they will soon be able to crack the code.Mongabay spoke with Freestone to find out more about leek orchids and what it takes to protect these tiny wildflowers.Marc Freestone. Image courtesy of Marc Freestone.Mongabay: What do you find most interesting about leek orchids?​Marc Freestone: It’s not so much about their looks (I like to think I’m a bit more discerning than that — although some are certainly very pretty!). I think I’m drawn to leek orchids because so many of them are at risk of extinction. And because some species can look a bit drab, they can slip away without most people ever knowing they existed. To me, they seem delicate and utterly defenseless against humans who have engulfed their world. Ironically, some species are now totally dependent of humans for their survival. I feel a great sense of responsibility to help them.How many species of leek orchids are at a risk of extinction, and what are the main causes of the species’ decline?​Officially we have 39 species listed as threatened under Australia’s national environmental law, making leek orchids the fifth-largest genus of plants listed under that law. That’s about a third of the approximately 140 leek orchid species Australia-wide. Only a couple of species occur outside Australia in New Zealand.Most of the threatened species grow in grasslands, woodlands or seasonal wetlands in the southeast of the country, areas with fertile soils and that were heavily cleared for agriculture in the first half of the last century. They cling on in narrow roadsides, beside rail lines or in rural cemeteries — tiny pockets of land that have never been plowed. For example, the lilac leek orchid (Prasophyllum colemaniae) grew beside a rail line in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne before works on the rail line destroyed the only known population in the ’70s. The only known population of the tan leek orchid (P. erythrocommum) north of Melbourne was destroyed when a firebreak was put through it during bushfires in 2009. Species that are on the very brink include the Shelford leek orchid (P. fosteri), which hasn’t been seen for a couple of years and the gaping leek orchid (P. correctum) which is probably down to fewer than 10 wild plants on a rail line east of Melbourne. Both species have a small amount of seed stored at the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, but that seed is getting older, it’s viability is probably decreasing, and we don’t know how to get it to grow with any measure of confidence.In an earlier interview, you mentioned that despite efforts to manage these orchids, their populations are still declining. Could you tell us why?​Most of our really rare leek orchids have active management plans, but for many of them their populations are still declining. We don’t know why, but it’s probably a combination of sustained below-average rainfall in the past few decades, combined with the inevitable loss of genetic diversity encountered by species with small populations. Other threats, particularly weeds and inappropriate fire regimes, are also significant for some species.Green leek orchid, a vulnerable species. Image by Marc Freestone.Do you see captive breeding as the only way of saving the endangered species of leek orchids?For our most critical species that are known from few, small populations that are declining toward zero plants despite our attempts at managing them, there really doesn’t appear to be any other alternative to captive breeding. There are probably 10 to 20 species of leek orchids that fall into this category. Some other threatened leek orchids are not quite at that point yet, and for those, continued emphasis of land management practices is probably a better option for the time being.Why haven’t researchers figured out how to grow these orchids in labs? And are you close to any breakthrough?Growing leek orchids is confusingly difficult. The Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria grows many other endangered Australian orchids by extracting the symbiotic fungi that live in the orchid’s roots, growing the fungi on petri dishes, and sprinkling on the orchid seed. The fungi are required to inoculate the seed to get it to germinate. But for some reason, leek orchid seed rarely germinates using this method, or any other method. My research project is testing a bunch of theories, ranging from seed viability, growing conditions, and the identity of the fungi that we find in the roots of the leek orchids. We don’t have any breakthroughs yet, although the results of chemical testing show that seed viability doesn’t appear to be a major issue. At the moment we have several large germination trials underway and a large DNA identification study for the symbiotic fungi — so we’re optimistic that the answers will lie somewhere in there.Could you tell us about the symbiotic fungi that leek orchids are associated with, and why they’re important?All wild orchids harbor symbiotic fungi that live in their roots and the surrounding soil. Due to the microscopic size of orchid seed, all orchids rely on these symbiotic fungi to inoculate their seed when it lands on the soil, prompting it to germinate (orchid seeds don’t have enough food reserves in them to germinate by themselves). Most species of Australian orchids appear to have very specific relationships, often each orchid has its own unique species of symbiotic fungus. However, some preliminary data that we have suggests that leek orchids can associate with multiple species of fungi, which begs the question: Which species of fungus is involved in the seed germination process? To answer that, we are burying small packets of seed around the wild leek orchid plants, hopefully some will germinate and we can then identify the species of fungus in the newly germinated seedling and compare it to the fungi we find in the roots of the adult plant at different times of year. We will then know if using the wrong fungus is the cause of the poor germination results in our laboratory trials.Seeds of leek orchids are incredibly hard to germinate and grow in the lab. Image by Marc Freestone.How is the Threatened Species Recovery Hub and Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria involved in saving these orchids? What species are you working on currently?The Australian government’s Threatened Species Recovery Hub is providing funding for this project, along with the Hermon Slade Foundation, Australian National University (who are funding my Ph.D.) and the Victoria state government. The research is based at the Orchid Conservation Program at the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria. The Rural City of Wangaratta, Project Platypus and the Australasian Native Orchid Society are also providing field assistance with the project. It really is a team effort and the generosity of our project partners and funding agencies is heartening and inspiring.We are working mostly on four main study species that are relatively common, but closely related to critically endangered species to which we will hopefully be able to apply our research findings. We are also collecting seed from our most threatened species, so that we will be ready to go if we can make a breakthrough on how to grow them.What do you think would happen if Australia lost its leek orchids?The alpine parts of the southeast of the country are still relatively untouched and there are several species of leek orchid that are very common up there. To be up in those high plains in summer when the alpine leek orchid (P. tadgellianum) is in full flower, the air sweet with the scent of its nectar, its flowers crawling with insects, you can really get a feel for what the lowland grasslands would have been like once upon a time, when species like the gaping leek orchid would have numbered in the millions, its flowers playing an important role in the food chain. Now there are perhaps 10 plants left. If it goes extinct, Australia will have lost part of what makes it unique. A small part perhaps, but when added to all the other threatened species in this country, a significant part.Is there anything else that you would like to add?I don’t think I have anything left to add other than to say — fingers crossed — stay tuned over the next year or two for any breakthroughs!Coastal leek orchid is known from a few hundred plants near Portland, Victoria. Image by Marc Freestone. Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Grasslands, Green, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Interviews, Interviews With Young Scientists, Orchids, Plants, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

In a Colombian sanctuary, once-trafficked birds fly again

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Conservation Solutions, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Heroes, Featured, Forestry, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mangroves, Poaching, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by mongabayauthorcenter_img Colombia is home to the most important aviary in South America, a sanctuary containing almost 2,000 birds.The privately run National Aviary of Colombia serves as a refuge in which birds representing 165 different species have a second chance at life after escaping the hands of illegal wildlife traffickers.So far in 2018, Colombian authorities have rescued nearly 4,000 birds — victims of a trafficking industry that has become the third-largest illicit economy in the country. BARU PENINSULA, Colombia — A 50-minute drive from Cartagena, the most important tourist city in Colombia, is a place that preserves the colors and sounds of biodiversity. A two-hour stroll through the 7 hectares (17 acres) of the National Aviary of Colombia takes visitors through a recreation of the remotest and most difficult-to-access wildernesses of this country. There are no cars honking or street vendors yelling here. The stress of the day dissipates amid the chorus of the nearly 2,000 birds that live here and have, for two and a half years, been part of the largest aviary in South America.The tour through the aviary starts with an immersion in nature, proceeding through three ecosystems and 21 exhibits. An intense heat can be felt in the forest, but it diminishes at times with the spray from the waterfalls. The humid tropical forest of the Chocó region and the Amazon is the first stop: visitors enter an immense cage to see 60 species of birds, including the blue-billed curassow (Crax alberti), endemic to Colombia and critically endangered; the Andean cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus); and the collared aracari (Pteroglossus torquatus).“The idea is that they inhabit very large spaces and that people have to find them. Here the sense of enclosure is lost,” says Martín Pescador Vieira, while pointing out a kingfisher (Alcedo atthis), the bird he was named after (pescador means “fisherman” in Spanish). Vieira, 24, is the son of Rafael Vieira and Silvana Obregón, a couple who turned their passion for birds into an opportunity to protect them. Over more than 12 years, they and a handful of friends have worked on this ambitious private project. It seeks to show the world the biodiversity of the country and to preserve the birdlife that is threatened — which is the case for almost 80 percent of the 165 species that call the aviary home.At the edge of the humid tropical forest, in another immense cage, lives the harpy eagle (Harpia harpyja), one of the most powerful raptors in the world and a main predator in this ecosystem. Even the enclosure cannot hide its nature. Its flight is imposing, menacing and confident. It is one of only four harpy eagles in captivity in the country; the other three live in the coastal city of Barranquilla and in a reserve in the municipality of Cota, in the department of Cundinamarca. All four ended up in captivity after losing their habitat, an increasingly common occurrence for Colombia’s wildlife. Fewer than 10,000 individuals of the species are estimated to remain in the country, where it has lost 26.4 percent of its historical habitat, according to the Red Book of Birds of Colombia by the Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Research on Biological Resources. For this reason, says Martín Vieira, it is important to protect and breed them.A harpy eagle. Image by Maria Fernanda Lizcano for Mongabay.Rescued from abuseThe harpy eagle is not the only threatened species here. Veterinarian Jonnathan Lugo, who has worked at the aviary for a year and a half, says nearly 80 percent of the birds have been rescued, most of them brought by local wildlife authorities known as Regional Autonomous Corporations (CAR). These agencies carry out operations with the police and military to combat wildlife trafficking. For the seized birds, the aviary is a sanctuary where they get a second chance at life.“They have given us parrots with dyed hair and burned nails,” Lugo says. “Barn owls and true owls have also arrived in very bad condition, often with the wings and claws fractured. On one occasion I received an owl with a very serious infection. A wing was broken, rotten and full of maggots. In the end, we couldn’t save it.” For Laura Saavedra, the aviary zootechnician — an expert in managing domestic or captive animals — the cases of the owls are the most painful, because in this region of Colombia these animals are associated with witchcraft and esotericism, and this is how they end up stoned, beaten and even shot in their small bodies.Ideally the birds should be allowed to live in complete freedom, but this isn’t possible for stigmatized species, those under some degree of threat and with a small population, or those that simply wouldn’t survive in their natural habitat, according to Vieira. “Many cannot be released because they would be hunted,” he says. “It is one of the dangers to which they are exposed. We try to educate people but it is a process that takes a long time.”A white-throated toucan (Ramphastos tucanus). The species is listed as vulnerable by the IUCN. Image by Maria Fernanda Lizcano for Mongabay.Hunting isn’t the only risk. Henry Perez, head of the planning office of the Directorate of Protection of the National Police, tells Mongabay that wildlife trafficking has become the third-largest illegal economy in Colombia, after drug trafficking and the black market for weapons. Between January and August this year, he says, more than 3,860 birds were seized from traffickers. The most targeted birds are canaries (like Sicalis flaveola), true parrots of the superfamily Psittacoidea, macaws of the genus Ara, and the yellow-crowned parrot (Amazona ochrocephala).“Most likely, by the end of 2018, this number will reach 5,000 or 6,000 individuals,” Perez says. “It is a business in which the villagers who capture [the birds] do not profit, only the traffickers.”He says the trappers get 50,000 to 100,000 pesos ($17 to $34) for catching a macaw in the wild, while the trafficker can sell it abroad for up to 5 million pesos ($1,670). Perez adds that the Colombian areas of major concern are the cities of Santa Marta and Medellín, and the regions of La Guajira and Urabá.A home to which they always returnThe second major ecosystem of the aviary is the coastline, distinguished by its extensive mangroves. There, most of the birds live freely, such as the black-bellied whistling duck (Dendrocygna autumnalis) and the black-crowned night heron (Nycticorax nycticorax), which arrive to breed. “The beauty of this ecosystem is that there are times you find many birds and then suddenly only a few,” Vieira says. “They return because they want to. They feel safe because they know that nothing bad will happen to them here. Last year there were at least 300 or 400 nests of night herons that came to have their chicks.”The jabiru stork (Jabiru mycteria) also inhabits this area. The highly territorial male bird finds it difficult to coexist with the aviary’s two females, so the three individuals must be kept in different environments. Further down are the flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber), which grew from a population of fewer than 20 individuals to about 145 in just seven years. Lugo says that to achieve an effective breeding program they had to modify the soil and build some nests. “This is how they got stimulated to start building [the nests] themselves,” he says. “It also provided the birds with a balanced diet.”Also present here, among others: the black-winged stilt (Himantopus himantopus), northern shoveler (Spatula clypeata), scarlet ibis (Eudocimus ruber), roseate spoonbill (Platalea ajaja), striped owl (Pseudoscops clamator), spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), great white egret (Ardea alba) and white ibis (Eudocimus albus), which this year produced 16 chicks.A white egret, right, and a black-crowned night heron. Image by Maria Fernanda Lizcano for Mongabay.Deeper into the aviary, the Barú heat becomes more intense. The land becomes arid as the ecosystem shifts to desert. The soundtrack here is the melodic song of the Venezuelan troupial (Icterus icterus) and the vermilion cardinal (Cardinalis phoeniceus). Later, stone-curlews (genus Burhinus), parrots and woodpeckers (family Picidae) appear. Lugo says one of the saddest moments at the aviary was when a group of 35 parakeets arrived; two of them were already dead and another four died shortly after. “We fed the others with a probe for a month and they were saved,” he says.As soon as the desert ends, a special atmosphere takes over: that of the Andean condor (Vultur gryphus), the emblematic bird of Colombia, which, despite sitting atop the country’s coat of arms and being a source of national pride, is in danger due to the loss of its habitat. According to the Humboldt Institute, it is estimated there are fewer than 130 condors left in the country, distributed between the ranges of Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta, Serrania del Perijá, Páramo de Cáchira, Macizo de Santurbán, Páramo del Almorzadero and Sierra Nevada del Cocuy.“The condor is a scavenger animal, it eats only dead animals,” Vieira says. “However, many villagers think that condors are the ones that kill [their] cattle and therefore they kill them … To save them requires education and the preservation of their territory.”A male Andean condor. Image by Maria Fernanda Lizcano for Mongabay.The Humboldt Institute, in its Red Book of Birds, says conservation measures should not only include the protection and reintroduction of the species, but also the recovery of their habitat, especially at a time when deforestation has spiked. Last year alone more than 2,200 square kilometers (850 square miles) of forest were cleared in Colombia, according to the environment ministry.The condor’s situation is so worrying that most of the aviary’s efforts are focused on getting it to breed. For more than a year, a male and a female have been left alone to try and mate. The process depends entirely on the chemistry and attraction between the two birds. These two have gotten along well, and both are of reproductive age. But the effort has to yield any chicks.Even though saving species and educating the public is a joint effort, it is a slow process. Luis Eduardo Pérez, from the Regional Autonomous Corporation that has jurisdiction over the Cartagena area, says the operations they have carried out against wildlife trafficking have served to discourage the possession of wild species. “[Twenty] to 30 percent of the animals that come to us are brought in voluntarily. This did not happen before,” he says.A passion inheritedFor as long as Martín Pescador Vieira can remember he has been surrounded by birds. When he was 2 years old, he watched his father carry pigeons and roosters to a small piece of land they had in El Palmar, in the Rosario Islands, a tiny archipelago that is part of the island zone of Cartagena. This wasn’t just a getaway for the Vieira Obregón family, but also the place where Martín’s father, Rafael, began to channel his passion for birds.The elder Vieira studied taxidermy in the U.K., his son says, but his interest has always been living animals.“That place was filled little by little with exotic species that my father’s friends brought. They did it for different reasons … because they found them wounded or because they simply did not want to have them in their homes anymore,” Martín says. “Then, if some acquaintance found, for example, a frigatebird [genus Fregata] with a broken wing, he gave it to my parents to rehabilitate it. If it could be released, it was released. If it could not fly, it stayed with us. And that’s how this started.”A ringed kingfisher. Image by Maria Fernanda Lizcano for Mongabay.Along with three friends, Rafael Vieira turned what was a hobby into a vision to ​​create a place that would gather much of the country’s biodiversity of birds. Getting started wasn’t easy, however, and El Palmar didn’t have even a hectare of land for such a project. They decided that a site on the Barú mainland was the best option, and construction began in 2006. In February 2016, they finally welcomed the public to the largest aviary in South America.“It was a private project that required a large investment of capital and time, so we opted to work on it calmly,” says Alba Lucía Gómez, one of the four founders and now the manager of the aviary. The hope is to one day have 34 exhibits and a veterinary clinic specializing in birds. Gómez says there are currently there only 24 people working in the entire aviary, but they do their utmost to rehabilitate the birds that arrive in serious health conditions and, above all, strive for the conservation and breeding of at-risk species such as the Andean condor, blue-billed curassow and harpy eagle.The dreams for the aviary haven’t stopped. Martín returned home to continue working with the birds after finishing his architecture studies at the University of Los Andes in Bogotá. “Next year my goal will be to gain experience and apply what I learn in the second stage of the aviary construction,” he says, adding that he sees his life revolving around caring for the birds.His father, meanwhile, has dedicated himself to another project, the Oceanarium Rosario Islands, a site he also founded with the aim of exhibiting, protecting and breeding the marine fauna and flora of the Colombian Caribbean.Back at the aviary, the tour isn’t over yet. Just as visitors start to feel they’ve seen everything, a team of caretakers, veterinarians and zootechnicians puts on the “Birds on the Fly” show: a half-hour spectacle in which 32 species show the public how high they can fly. The workers use this opportunity to teach visitors about the importance of each species.At the end of the exhibition and continuing down the road, a lake appears in the distance, a pit stop for free-flying migratory birds. The aviary ends at the lake, with a huge showcase of macaws and parrots in search of food. Even though they’re free to come and go, they don’t leave.This is their home now.Banner: An Andean condor. Image by Nathan Rupert/Flickr.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

UK supermarkets implicated in Amazon deforestation supply chain: report

first_imgDeforestation due to cattle ranching has increased in Brazil since 2014. With between 60 and 80 percent of deforested Amazon lands used for pasture, European retailers who source beef from Brazil risk amplifying Amazonian forest destruction unless international action is taken.A report from the UK organization Earthsight finds that UK supermarket chains — including Sainsbury’s, Asda, Morrisons and Lidl — are still importing corned beef from Brazil’s largest beef producer, JBS, despite the company being implicated in a long string of corruption and illegal deforestation scandals over the last decade.JBS, one of the largest food companies in the world, has faced multiple corruption charges leading to the arrest of two of its former CEOs and was fined $8 million in 2017 for illegal deforestation in the Amazon.Many hope the forthcoming EU Communication on Stepping Up Action to Halt Deforestation will propose legislation to ensure EU companies and suppliers are not contributing to deforestation and human rights abuses. However, experts say such an agreement will only work if corporate standards are mandatory not voluntary. Cattle in the Brazilian Amazon. Image © Henrique Manreza courtesy of The Nature ConservancyMay is not even half over, but it has already been a landmark month for environmental news: last week the United Nations IPBES issued its preliminary global assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, finding that humans in both the developed and developing world are now the biggest driver of biodiversity loss. This comes hot on the heels of the UK parliament declaring a “climate emergency,” along with increasing pressure applied on the EU to regulate commodities that cause deforestation.One major instigator of all these environmental emergencies: cows, lots of them, and meat producers.Cattle are a key driver of deforestation, especially in Latin America, responsible for between 60 to 80 percent of Amazon tree loss, which contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions.A new report, also out in May, shines a spotlight on the UK and major European supermarkets that are potentially fueling illegal deforestation by doing business with Brazil’s cattle industry — particularly with beef producer, JBS. The retail chains continue to stock corned beef sourced from the firm which has been implicated in serious environmental and human rights abuses, according to UK investigative organization Earthsight.Buy beef from Brazil, and it’s difficult not to buy meat linked to JBS. The firm is one of the world’s largest food companies, and as a 2018 Chain Reaction Research report found, one of just three meatpacking companies (JBS, Minerva, and Marfrig) that control around 70 percent of the cattle slaughterhouse capacity in the Brazilian Amazon.Newgate brand sold by Lidl and allegedly sourced from JBS. Image ©EarthsightIn 2016, JBS was Brazil’s leading exporter of beef, according to Forest500. But for the last 10 years, the company has been dogged by serious corruption and deforestation charges, leading for example to the arrest of two of its former CEO’s Joesley and Wesley Batista — part of a JBS bribery scandal that went all the way to the top, to Brazilian President Michel Temer.Despite these issues, the UK, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium and Spain bought almost 90 percent of JBS’s European beef exports in 2018; with the UK alone importing 28,550 metric tons (31,500 US tons) of corned beef.Corned beef supplied by JBS was found on shelves at Sainsbury’s, Asda, Morrisons and Lidl by Earthsight researchers. Morrisons and Lidl source JBS beef for their own house brands of corned beef, while Sainsbury’s and Asda stock Exeter and Princes corned beef, also supplied by JBS.When Mongabay reached out the retailers, none of them confirmed or denied the allegations in the report. Instead they referred to a statement from the British Retail Consortium that says “The BRC and our members regard any form of labor abuse and illegal deforestation as completely unacceptable. All suppliers are expected to be compliant with local laws and retailers’ own high standards. Retailers underpin this with codes of conduct agreed with suppliers, robust auditing, training for staff and collaborative schemes.”Critics question the continued support by these major UK retailers of the Brazilian firm. “JBS has proved that it can’t be trusted again and again. They made various promises to clean up their act,” but haven’t, says Earthsight Director Sam Lawson. “What we have understood is that governments need to act. Companies cannot do it themselves.”Livestock pens at a Brazilian slaughterhouse. Image by Marizilda Cruppe / EVE / GreenpeaceCattle and Amazon deforestationTo talk about deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon — where there are four cows for every one person — is to talk about cattle.Nearly half of the world’s deforestation currently occurs in the “arc of deforestation,” located along the southern border of the Amazon rainforest and within the Cerrado savanna biome of Brazil. Most of that deforestation is illegal, with human-induced wild fires used to clear native vegetation for new cattle pastures being the largest driver. A study by the Brazilian NGO Imazon found that JBS ranked number one among meat-packing firms that buy cattle in the Amazon for exposure to deforestation risk because of the location of the slaughterhouses which were near 1.7 million hectares of embargoed farms, 1.6 million hectares of area deforested from 2010-2015, and 1.2 million hectares of forest at risk for deforestation from 2016 to 2018. The same study also found that companies like JBS would benefit most from increased control and regulation.“Cattle ranching is what replaces most of the forest,” says Philip Fearnside, an ecologist at the National Institute for Research in Amazonia who has researched Amazon deforestation for two decades. “All the cattle that are raised in the Amazon, one way or another, have to go through slaughterhouses to get out [for exportation]. Certainly JBS is the biggest [producer doing business here] — so a lot of the beef winds up there.”According to the Brazilian non-profit research institution Imazon, pastures occupied 65 percent of the area deforested in the Brazilian Amazon in 2013-2014. Since 2014, the country’s deforestation rates have increased with decade-high levels of forest loss documented in 2018 — the same year that Brazil slaughtered nearly 32 million heads of cattle, the highest level since 2014.UK retailer Asda stocks Exeter and Princes corned beef, allegedly both supplied by JBS. Image ©EarthsightIn 2017, JBS was fined $8 million by Brazil for buying nearly 50,000 head of cattle from ranches guilty of illegal deforestation in the Amazon. More recently, an investigation by O Eco, a Brazilian environmental news agency and Mongabay co-publishing partner, alleged that JBS sourced cattle from at least four illegal ranches operating within the Jaci-Paraná Extractive Reserve in Rondônia state in December 2018.“The cattle procurement operations and the entire monitoring system of suppliers are audited annually and independently,” JBS wrote in a comment to Mongabay. According to the firm, the results of their audits reveal that more than 99.9 percent of JBS cattle purchases over the last three years complied with the company’s social and environmental criteria.According to the report however, this is not the case. The public prosecutor’s office in Pará state, which in 2016 commissioned its own audits of large meat producers, found that JBS was one of the worst performing meatpackers in the state during that year.“This is a company that can’t be trusted,” says Lawson. “Every time someone calls them out on illegal deforestation, the assumption is that JBS is a trustworthy corporate entity who has accidentally done something wrong and will change. If you look at the bigger picture it shows you the intention is different. The idea that you can trust them is insane.”Analysts say that a bookkeeping loophole built into Brazilian environmental law allows for the easy, large scale laundering of cattle: Brazilian cattle are often raised initially at ranches that cause major deforestation, with the animals moved later to ranches that have not caused tree loss, and the livestock then sold to slaughterhouses who only need to identify the most recent source of the animals. Thus, deforestation remains hidden.Clearing land for cattle ranching is the largest driver of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Widespread corruption The Earthsight report also sheds light on the sweeping corruption and bribery scandals that have plagued JBS in recent years.“As the report points out, JBS has been one key company in funding political campaigns legally and illegally,” says Imazon Senior Researcher Paulo Barreto. “They funded campaigns and bribed politicians to benefit from environmental deregulation, tax breaks and subsidized loans.”In May 2017, JBS was implicated by the federal Lava Jato investigation, Operation Car Wash, the biggest corruption scandal in Brazil’s history. Independent litigators found that company executives had made illegal campaign donations to 1,829 candidates from 28 political parties over a period of more than ten years. J&F Investimentos, JBS’s controlling shareholder, agreed to pay a R$10.3 billion ($3.2 billion) fine for JBS’s role in the scandal. Under Brazilian law, when members of cartels or other corruption schemes expose other players in the scheme they are awarded a lesser fine, called a leniency fine. The fine paid by J&F Investimentos was the world’s largest leniency fine ever levied.According to a company statement, “JBS reaffirms its continuous commitment on Compliance and Corporate Governance, in a transparent and solid approach, aligned with the pillars and guidelines that guide the day-by-day management of the Company. In 2018, the Global Compliance Board celebrated the 99% brand of employees and 100% of the company’s leadership have been capacitated in ethics and governance across the world.”Former president Temer is thought to have received as much as R$38 million (US$12 million) in bribes from JBS. This year, a Brazilian court accepted criminal charges against Temer presented by a federal public prosecutor in connection with the case.The corruption charges don’t stop there. In 2017, as part of operation “Carne Fraca,” (Weak Flesh), Brazilian federal agents raided meatpacking plants and accused JBS and other producers of bribing government meat inspectors to ignore food safety regulations, leading to temporary bans on Brazilian meat around the globe. A Guardian investigation, also in 2017, found JBS products sold in Europe could contain meat linked to slave labor on a Brazilian farm, leading some European retailers, such as Waitrose, to pull their store brand corned beef, sourced with JBS, from shelves.A bookkeeping loophole built into Brazilian environmental law allows for the easy, large scale laundering of cattle that have been raised on recently deforested lands. Image by Marizilda Cruppe /EVE / GreenpeaceCattle agreement in limboBrazilian meat processing corruption cases have proven to be a major stumbling block to the voluntary Zero Deforestation Amazon Cattle Agreement, an historic accord signed in 2009 by the then four largest meatpackers in response to a report by Greenpeace, “Slaughtering the Amazon.” That report detailed the link between forest destruction, the expansion of cattle ranching in the Amazon, and meatpacking plants located in Pará state.The highly critical report led to suits by the Brazilian government against meatpackers like JBS for buying from ranches linked to illegal deforestation. The companies then agreed to Conduct Adjustment Terms (TAC), requiring them to exclude source farms involved in any deforestation, slave labor or invasions of indigenous lands and protected areas.While some progress has been made, many experts agree that too many loopholes remain.“The settlement agreements signed by the meatpackers have not been enough to curb deforestation,” says Baretto. “The fact that deforestation has increased after companies signed agreements is a clear indicator that they have to improve implementation.”In 2017, Greenpeace suspended its negotiations with JBS in large part due to the revelation of the involvement of the controlling partners of JBS in corruption.“The [Operation Car Wash] scandal was more highlighted in JBS, but the corruption was through the whole [meat processing] sector,” says Adriana Charoux, Amazon campaigner at Greenpeace Brasil who worked on the cattle agreement. “What we have learned is that if there is not support from the Brazilian government and the sectors that acknowledge zero-deforestation policies and enforce it for the producer, than it won’t work. More than ever now the international community has to demand criteria for responsible cattle production.”A single tree stands in a soy field near the BR 163 highway in Pará state. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon typically takes place in a multiple stage process: new roads provide access, then land speculation is followed by logging, cattle ranching, and eventually conversion to croplands, especially soy. Image by Daniel Beltrà / GreenpeaceImport-export regulation a way forwardEarthsight’s investigation is the most recent in a series of reports spotlighting the outsized role that the EU plays in contributing to deforestation, especially in tropical countries.But when Mongabay reached out to Lidl, Asda, Sainsbury’s and other’s listed in the report, they offered little in the way of solutions. A spokesperson for the British Retail Consortium (BRC) responded: “Whilst it is recognized that Brazil has significant challenges, the country has led efforts to tackle modern slavery through a mix of laws and enforcement. However, recent legislative developments may be putting that progress at risk and this example demonstrates how vital it is for effective laws and enforcement to protect people and the environment from exploitation. We urge the Brazilian government to take swift action to address this issue throughout the supply chains.”With the recent ascent of rightist President Jair Bolsonaro, and the application of his extreme policies favoring agribusiness at the expense of indigenous groups and the “unproductive Amazon,” many scientists, activists and NGOs both nationally and internationally are increasing pressure on the EU to regulate Brazilian commodities that cause deforestation and are linked to human rights abuses.Morrisons own brand corned beef allegedly sourced with JBS. Image ©Earthsight“The situation is getting worse [now that] the agribusiness lobby has pressured government to weaken environmental regulation.” Says Imazon’s Baretto. “They have gotten what they wanted, such as a pardon for illegal deforestation, reduction of protected areas and extension of the deadline to legalize grabbed public lands.”Many are hoping that the forthcoming EU Communication on Stepping Up Action to Halt Deforestation will propose legislation to ensure that EU companies and their suppliers are not contributing to deforestation and human rights abuses. But critics, including Sam Lawson, are worried that any resulting law will rely too heavily on voluntary deforestation commitments from corporations.“When all these zero deforestation things started popping up in 2011, there was a lot of self-congratulating in the forest policy world,” says Lawson. “What worried me most [then] was that the high-level people would get the sense that the deforestation problem was being solved [by the companies]. All these [voluntary] zero deforestation policies are distracting from what really needs to happen. There needs to be legislative action.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon Soy, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Controversial, Corporate Social Responsibility, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Industrial Agriculture, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation, Zero Deforestation Commitments last_img read more